Successful Women of Israel

stories featuring Israel's successful women

Category: Women and Business (page 2 of 3)

InspHERation: Bat-chen Grinberg – Founder of MC Forum and Creative Director of FailCon

 Bat-chen Grinberg

Bat-chen Grinberg is the founder of the training centre for B2B marketers, MC Forum, and the creative director of FailCon. Prior to that Bat-chen was responsible for establishing the first international distribution network of its kind in the field of media and film productions, developing the international market for documentaries, including the award-winning animated war documentary, “Waltz with Bashir.”

I met with Bat-Chen met at WeWork Sarona in Tel-Aviv, a beautiful workspace environment for entrepreneurs, freelancers, startups and small businesses. Nothing could have prepared me for this very special encounter. Bat-chen was lavish in her marketing advice and stories and about her journey and success. I’m so excited to share the details of our conversation with you.

How the movie “Waltz with Bashir” Almost Didn’t Happen

“Waltz with Bashir” is a heartbreaking masterpiece. Its powerful story breaks the barriers of time and space, penetrates your heart and simultaneously builds and destroys your faith in mankind.  read more

InspHERation: Emma Butin – Innovator, Strategic Advisor & Teacher

Emma Butin is an innovator, strategic advisor, teacher and lecturer at IDC. I met up with her to discuss her thoughts about small businesses, strategies and success, and learned of her profound love for Israel and her passion in promoting its prosperity.  

I first heard Emma Butin speak at Temech’s 7th annual conference where she intrigued me with an inspiring talk about the DNA of billion dollar companies. Since then, Shaindy Babad, CEO of Temech, and an inspiring woman in her own right, has brought Emma back to Temech to teach Emma’s “Prosperity from Within” course which teaches women how small tweaks to their business can make a tremendous difference to their bottom line results. I am a participant in the course.

Israel – Land of the Entrepreneur  

After learning that Emma was born in Israel, that she moved to America at age 13 and then returned at age 26, I wondered why. What caused Emma to come back? Her immediate answer was “this is the place to be.” Sure, Emma says, Israel isn’t only a “startup Mecca” it “creates a lot of opportunities for people that are really driven,” but beyond that Emma explained that she is here, because in her words “Israel is in my DNA. I really love this country. There is no other logical explanation.” read more

My 3 Big Takeaways from the Tel Aviv Women & Business Conference 2017

On Monday (January 16, 2017), I attended the 3rd annual Women & Business conference, for the second time.

Once again, the conference was emceed by the lovely Orly Vilnai; she kept things on track, bridged seamlessly between speakers and spent breaks patiently taking selfies with her adoring crowd.  

What made this conference so exciting for me, and the reason I decided to attend again, is the opportunity to learn from and meet so many talented and inspiring women.

And though the image used for the conference portrays your typical attractive woman in professional attire, the actual speakers were so varied; they were of different backgrounds, political leanings (two women Knesset members, from different parties spoke), and their professions ranged from musicians and comic artists to mentors and leaders of large organizations.    read more

InspHERation: Orit Freilich – Artist, Fashion Designer and Feminist

Orit Freilich quote

Orit Freilich is an artist, fashion designer, entrepreneur, and senior lecturer at Shenkar college. She’s firm, yet flexible, living the dichotomy of two religions – fashion and Orthodox Judaism. I recently met up with her to discuss her journey and her success, and I picked up some important tips she has for women.  

Peering into the world of Orthodox Jews, many would say they’ve chosen a restrictive lifestyle. And maybe they have. But according to Orit, the world of fashion is far more restricting than even the modesty guidelines of the Orthodox world.

LIVING THE ‘CRAZY DICHOTOMY’

As a young girl and later as a mother to girls, Orit felt the modesty restrictions of the Jewish Orthodox world. In the ‘80s and ‘90s, working as a designer for the then-popular Israeli Bakardi jeans company, she felt the restrictions of the fashion world. “I realized that I’m living in a crazy dichotomy. There’s me and myself and so many questions that I have for myself, as if I haven’t yet defined myself….That’s when my breakthrough as an artist began. So I wrote a manifesto for myself, with myself. I called it, The Religion of Fashion. I came out against fashion. I said…you see me as a religious person [and as] a designer as if I’m unusual, as if I can’t be a religious person and a designer; as if fashion is so open and unrestricted. And I say it is the most limiting, most closed, and most rigid.” read more

How I’ll Turn my 2016 Fails into my 2017 Wins

Frustrated and failing

I did a lot of things right in 2016. But I did many things wrong, or not good enough. And though I know that it’s really important to focus on the good, it’s at least equally important to take stock of the things I could have done better.

Here’s my personal list of 2016 fails and how I’m going to make good on them in 2017. If you can learn from my mistakes by becoming wiser than I was before I made them, my 2016 stumbles and falls will have been worth it.

So here are my 2016 fails and how I plan to turn them into my 2017 wins:
1. I didn’t target my ideal client enough

Until about halfway through 2016 I wasn’t entirely sure about my target audience. What’s interesting about this, is that understanding a business’s target audience is something I help clients figure out, if it’s not already obvious to them. But for some reason I was having trouble doing it for myself. I’m grateful to Charlie Kalech for helping me figure this out. Once I understood my target audience, I should have created an entirely new list of prospect. I didn’t. read more

Older posts Newer posts